Yorkshire Terrier

FCI standard Nº 86

Origin
Great Britain
Group
Group 3 Terriers
Section
Section 4 Toy Terriers
Working
Without working trial
Acceptance on a definitive basis by the FCI
Saturday 30 October 1954
Publication of the official valid standard
Thursday 10 November 2011
Last update
Wednesday 22 February 2012
En français, cette race se dit
Yorkshire Terrier
Diese Norm ist in deutscher Sprache sichtbar
Yorkshire Terrier
En español, esta raza se dice
Yorkshire Terrier
In het Nederlands, wordt dit ras gezegd
Yorkshire Terrier

Usage

Companion Dog.

Brief historical summary

The Yorkshire Terrier comes from the same locale as the Airedale Terrier and was first seen around the 1850s. The old Black and Tan Terrier is behind the Yorkshire Terrier, together with other breeds such as the Maltese and the Skye Terrier. The current name was accepted in 1870. The breed’s terrier-like qualities include the hunting instinct, be it for a toy in the house or a rodent in the garden.

General appearance

Long-coated, coat hanging quite straight and evenly down each side, a parting extending from nose to end of tail. Very compact and neat, carriage very upright conveying an important air.

Important proportions

General outline conveying impression of vigorous and well proportioned body.

Behaviour / temperament

Alert, intelligent toy terrier. Spirited with even disposition.

Head

Cranial region

Skull
Rather small and flat, not too prominent or round. 

Facial region

Nose
Black.
Muzzle
Not too long.
Jaws and teeth
Perfect, regular and complete scissor bite, i. e. upper teeth closely overlapping the lower teeth and set square to the jaws. Teeth well placed with even jaws.
Eyes
Medium, dark, sparkling, with sharp intelligent expression and placed to look directly forward. Not prominent. Edge of eyelids dark.
Ears
Small, V-shaped, carried erect, not too far apart, covered with short hair, colour very deep, rich tan.

Neck

Good reach.

Body

Body
Compact.
Back
Level.
Loin
Well sustained.
Ribs
Moderate spring of ribs.

Tail

Previously customarily docked.
Docked: Medium length with plenty of hair, darker blue in colour than rest of body, especially at end of tail. Carried a little higher than level of back.
Undocked: Plenty of hair, darker blue in colour than rest of body, especially at end of tail. Carried a little higher than level of back. As straight as possible. Length to give a well balanced appearance.

Limbs

Forequarters

Generality
Legs straight, well covered with hair of rich golden tan a few shades lighter at end than at roots, not extending higher on forelegs than elbows.
Shoulders
Well laid.
Forearm
Straight.
Forefeet
Round; nails black.

Hindquarters

Generality
Legs quite straight when viewed from behind, moderate turn of stifle. Well covered with hair of rich golden tan a few shades lighter at ends than at roots, not extending higher on hind legs than stifle.
Stifle
Moderate turn of stifle.
Hind feet
Round; nails black.

Gait and movement

Free with drive ; straight action front and behind, retaining level topline.

Coat

Hair
On body moderately long, perfectly straight (not wavy), glossy; fine silky texture, not woolly, must never impede movement. Fall on head long, rich golden tan, deeper in colour at sides of head, about ear roots and on muzzle where it should be very long. Tan on head not to extend on to neck, nor must any sooty or dark hair intermingle with any of tan.
Colour
Dark steel blue (not silver blue), extending from occiput to root of tail, never mingled with fawn, bronze or dark hairs. Hair on chest rich, bright tan. All tan hair darker at the roots than in middle, shading to still lighter at tips.

Size and weight

Weight
Up to 3,2 kgs.

Faults

• Any departure from the foregoing points should be considered a fault and the seriousness with which the fault should be regarded should be in exact proportion to its degree and its effect upon the health and welfare of the dog and its ability to perform its traditional work.
• Faults listed should be in degree of seriousness.

Disqualifying faults

 Aggressive or overly shy dogs.

NB :

• Any dog clearly showing physical or behavioural abnormalities shall be disqualified.
• The above mentioned faults when occurring to a highly marked degree or frequently are disqualifying.
• Male animals should have two apparently normal testicles fully descended into the scrotum.
• Only functionally and clinically healthy dogs, with breed typical conformation should be used for breeding.

Bibliography

http://www.fci.be/

 

Detailed history

To see today the type resolutely modern, and even "in the wind", the Yorkshire Terrier, who would believe it centenary? And to watch him lounging limply on cushions, how to imagine it in the fields and on the hunt? Yet it is well in the last century and dogs all that there is more common that was born this dandy all in hair. From the musettes of the Scottish hunters to the Parisian shows, the Yorkshire Terrier has come a long way, a path that should lead him to glory.

One of the most famous dogs in the world owes its existence to a wave of emigration which, at the beginning of the nineteenth century, brought textile workers from the Glasgow area to York County or Yorkshire. rather poor, were hunting enthusiasts and, we will have guessed, poaching of all kinds.For these two activities, one legal, the other not, they had nimble and courageous dogs, very similar to Skye Terriers except that they had soft hair, while the Skye hardened it, so the Clydesdale Terriers (or Paisley Terriers) were small but quite long and heavy dogs, and in Yorkshire they were crossed with the local dogs, known as "broken-haired Terriers." The result was a smaller, slimmer animal, and blood infusions Skye Dandie Dinmont, Manchester (or Black and Tan Terrier) completed the creation of Yorkshire Terrier Smaller, more alert, this The dog was quick at the burrow and on the game, but also easy to hide in the musette in the event of a "flagrant crime" of poaching. He lacked only the long hair, which he soon acquired thanks to the contributions of Bichon Maltais, a dog that the British sailors brought back from their peregrinations in the Mediterranean. And that's how our Yorkshire Terrier was born (in a primitive form) in 1870 and was well typified in 1880.

This little dog at once beautiful and pleasant to live (he was courageous, docile and faithful), far from remaining in the sole possession of the hunters, quickly seduced the bourgeois of the region. The ranchers, finding a good way to make money, developed a line of Yorkshire Terriers that proved to be very lucrative. The breed began to be present in dog shows, competing in the category "Miscellaneous Terriers", until, in 1886, the British Kennel Club officially recognized it under its present name. The Yorkshire Terrier Club was soon established, but the first official standard was not finalized until 1898.

Fortunately, the type of the breed had already been well established for some twenty years, with a particular importance attached to the quality and color of its dress, and by 1874 Mr. Franck Pearse had created the first stud- book (breeding register) in Kent. The Yorkshire Terrier reached the United States before 1880 and in France in 1920. Everywhere, the breed was a great success and a rapid expansion.

A fashion settled soon. The York became the indispensable dog, and hundreds of farms were formed. Unfortunately, demand continued to grow, and dog traffickers had a hard time importing from England, the Netherlands or Belgium puppies with more than doubtful origins, with fake pedigrees, often barely weaned and unvaccinated. . This sad situation still exists, so be extremely careful when buying a Yorkshire puppy. The wisest is to join the Club, which, he can indicate breeders with puppies for sale, those are of course registered with the LOF (thus able to receive a final pedigree after confirmation), vaccinated, tattooed and the most often from award-winning dogs on show. Even the amateur who does not want to compete should talk to these conscientious breeders, who will provide him with a "companion" puppy, rather than buying from an unscrupulous merchant an unfortunate Yorkshire baby who is in danger of falling. sick and perish within forty-eight hours.

The Breed Club makes a lot of effort in this respect and maintains in France an excellent quality. Over the years, although it has not undergone any real modifications, the Yorkshire standard has received different interpretations, especially at the level of hair, which judges require more and more silky.

The habit does not make the monk, and this is especially true about the Yorkshire Terrier. He who seems to enjoy himself only in the velvet salons is in fact a robust outdoor dog who never balks in front of a good walk in the forest and will exhaust many big dogs, left behind behind his little tireless trot. We must not forget that it comes from rough Terriers specializing in the hunting of rats and other uncomfortable game. If the nice Yorkie falls on a mouse at the turn of a garden path, the unfortunate girl is likely to die. This is to say that the York has lost nothing of its peasant atavism and that it is more robust, and above all more secure, than its sumptuous fur could reveal.

Of course, there is no question of imposing bottom races, nor to launch on jumps worthy of a Malinois. Do not wait for him to guard the property with the daring of a Dobermann. The heart is there, but means are lacking. Yorkshire must be appreciated for what it is: a small pet dog as bright as a Terrier and affectionate as a real hound. He likes children's games, with which he gets on very well, provided they know how to respect his long hairs and his little ears, so tempting for curious hands. In case of prolonged "persecution", the Yorkshire sends its message gently but firmly, grunting a good shot. Not resentful for a penny, he happily resumed the game with toddlers, now very aware that a dog is not a toy. At home, he likes moments of abandonment, during which he is capable of an overflowing tenderness, taking the knees of his masters for the softest cushions. None of their activities escapes him, and no way for him to leave them alone for a moment. He decided they still need his help. With an insatiable curiosity, he is constantly poking around the house or garden, carefully observing all around him, then retreating to a comfortable place and resting with the confused air of drawing his conclusions. When you see him like that, no doubt, he thinks.

The walks are also welcome in his program, especially as, in case he gets tired first (which is unlikely), his master will have no trouble carrying his 3 kilos on the way home. Many York owners are reluctant to let their dogs out so that they do not dirty their fur: it's a shame on Yorkshire, who loves the outdoors, and it's better to choose another breed. If it gets dirty, it is gently wiped with a towel and then brush or wash an hour later, when the mud has dried.

Would he be docile? Not really, and it takes a good dose of canine psychology to overcome his malice and make him obey, without being caught by his charm and forget the order given, which is absolutely catastrophic for the rest of his education. Very clever, he quickly understands where are the weaknesses of his master and does not fail to exploit them to the fullest. That the chair is forbidden yesterday, neutral today and accessible tomorrow, and it will settle on for life. With him, one has no right to the error, on pain of seeing him become absolutely indifferent to what one can ask him. A firm and well-conducted education (that is from a very young age) can, on the other hand, turn it into a true gentleman. The basic rules are learned (quickly, because it is clever.), It will surprise by his good will, and he will invent even small tricks of his own, just to impress! Because it is a very lively dog, our Yorkshire, a friend of all ages, irreplaceable companion of single or elderly people, pride of confirmed exhibitors, passion of breeders devoted to its cause. And that the ratings of popularity do not worry him too much: he is already a great classic and a big dog.

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