Chinook

He is not recognized by the F.C.I.

Origin
U.S.A.
Translation
Francis Vandersteen
This breed is also known as
American Chinook
The Chinook is a Nordic breed descended from a single ancestor. The breed's sire, Chinook, was born on author/explorer Arthur Walden's New Hampshire farm of Wonalancet in 1917. He was one of three puppies born to a female "Northern Husky", sired by one of the dogs on the North Pole team. Chinook's father was a large mixed-breed dog. Chinook was a "sportsman", a freak of nature, not like either of his parents. He was an exceptional sled dog and accompanied Admiral Byrd's South Pole expedition in 1927. Chinook's offspring, which inherited his color, size and general characteristics, were bred to combine the strength of the big sled dog with the speed of the smaller racing dogs. By the early 1900s, the Chinook was setting records for distance traveled, loads carried and time on the trail. This breed has been bred over the years by a small number of dedicated breeders. The Chinook is a very rare breed. The Guinness Book of Records ranked the Chinook as the rarest dog in the world in 1966, when only 125 existed. The Chinook was an exceptional sled dog, but by the 1980s the breed was almost extinct, with only 12 reproducible dogs in the world. Their sled training is considerably reduced. They are much more of a companion dog, able to do any kind of work, but they really enjoy sledding, skijoring and go-karting. They are particularly good at karting because, unlike their Siberian and Alaskan counterparts, they are easily obedience-trained and can work very calmly in harness. Breeders are working to gain recognition and are actively seeking sledders to work with breeders in programs that emphasize working qualities. The Chinook Club was recognized by the United Kennel Club in March 1991. The United Kennel Club has worked with the COA (Chinook Owners Association) to develop a crossbreeding program that uses dogs bred within the breed to create more diversity and health. There is an application process, strict guidelines and a committee to oversee the entire program. On completion of the program, dogs will be eligible for purebred registration in the UKC. In an unprecedented move, the UKC is also allowing intact Chinook Cross LP registrations. (Only unspayed dogs can be registered in UKC.) The Chinooks New England Club is one of COA's affiliated clubs. They also work hard to preserve the breed.

The Chinook has a compact, muscular body that suits this gentle sled dog well. The body is well balanced, with deep chest, moderate bone and supple musculature. The skin on the head is tight without wrinkles. The stop is moderate, with a furrow running vertically from the stop to the occiput. The muzzle is powerful and the teeth are long-lasting. The breed's rather wind-blown, bending ear carriage gives the dogs a curious, pleading gleam. However, the ears can also be erect. The nose has wide nostrils, should be black and project slightly over the mouth. The lips are black. The upper lip overhangs the lower lip very slightly, and the corners of the lower lip are slightly pendulous. The teeth meet in a scissor bite. The eyes are almond-shaped and medium-sized, with an intelligent expression. Dark brown eyes are preferred, but lighter amber eyes are acceptable. Eye rims are darkly pigmented. Feet are oval, firm and compact, with well knit, well arched toes and hard, deeply padded, dark pads. The toes are moderately webbed and the feet are well hairy, even between the toes. Front feet turn slightly outwards. Dewclaws can be removed from the front feet and, if present, are usually removed from the rear feet. The tail is thick at the root and tapers to the tip. When the dog is standing, the tail hangs down to about the hocks. When the dog moves, the tail is carried. The Chinook's tail is never cut. Chinooks have a double coat of medium-length hair. The undercoat is thick, soft and downy in texture. The outer layer is coarse and the hairs are close to the body. Less dense coats are normal in very hot climates. The neck is well furnished with hair, forming a protective collar that blends into the apron. The tail is well hairy, with longer hairs at the base and underside of the tail. The groin and inside of the hind legs are protected by the coat. In color, the Chinook is fawn (a golden fawn).

They are dedicated, diligent and versatile sled dogs. Getting the job done is their main preoccupation in life. In addition to pulling the sled, the breed can also be used for karting, obedience, flyball, search and rescue, and packing. The dog's build, coupled with its agile movement and drive, make it a great agility dog. One of the breed's main characteristics is the Chinook's temperament: calm, non-aggressive, with a willing and friendly disposition. Chinooks are bred to work as a team and should not show aggression. Despite their gentle, even temperament, Chinooks are dignified dogs. Socialize them well to prevent them from being reserved with strangers or unfamiliar surroundings. In action, the Chinook is graceful yet determined, alert yet calm. His expression reflects his intelligence, his proud bearing reflects his dignity. Most Chinooks are excellent pets for children, especially when the dog is raised with them (even with restless children). Most Chinooks tolerate children even if they have no contact with them. These dogs are incredibly loyal. They work totally reliably and really only want to be with you. Given the distances and acres of land, the dogs will generally be where you are. So you don't need a lot of space, but you do need to take them for daily walks where they are heeled alongside or behind you, never in front, as the pack leader does first. Chinooks need to be close to their family and part of the family. They don't make good outdoor pets. The Chinook is generally good with non-dog pets. They need an owner who is confident and firm with them, but not harsh. If you're passive with them, they'll get strong. They need to know who the "best dog" is. Chinooks train easily with positive reinforcement, but don't respond to tough training tactics. Calm authority in a way that dogs can understand is best. They are highly intelligent and only need to know what you want them to do.

The following health conditions have been observed in the Chinook breed as a whole: excessive shyness, eye abnormalities, hip dysplasia, hormonal skin problems, mono/bilateral cryptorchidism, convulsions and spondylosis. Generally speaking, the breed is very healthy and these diseases occur in a small percentage of the population. Breeders work hard to screen out dogs with the diseases listed above, and buyers should ensure that a puppy's parents are certified as free of eye and hip disease.

Chinooks make good apartment dogs as long as the owner commits to regular exercise and walking. They don't bark often and can be reliably left after the puppy stage for periods of time. Unlike their Nordic breed counterparts, these dogs don't make good outdoor pets. They are emotionally over-sensitive, and isolation from human contact triggers separation anxiety and other emotional disorders. These dogs should not be kept in a garden and should always be considered part of the family.

Chinooks need moderate exercise and are not hyper-dogs, but should be taken for a daily walk. Once the exercise is over, the dog will easily entertain itself or rest.

The Chinook's coat practically takes care of itself and requires little or no grooming. Chinooks have a double coat consisting of a fluffy undercoat and an overcoat. Some Chinook owners have reported that their dogs shed twice a year for about a week, otherwise they shed very little. Others reported that their dogs shed a lot all year round. One owner said, "Kodi sheds VERY heavily almost year-round (despite regular brushing of his coat). Oz is also an excreter - but not as much as Kodi. I think anyone with a Chinook should be prepared for dog hair. in the house".

Height at withers : Males 58 to 69 cm, females 53 to 64 cm.

Weight : Males average 32 kg, females 25 kg.

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