Saint-Germain Pointer

FCI standard Nº 115

Origin
France
Translation
John Miller and Raymond Triquet
Group
Groupe 7 Chiens d'arrêt
Section
Section 1.1 Continental Pointing Dogs « Braque » Type
Working
With working trial
Acceptance on a definitive basis by the FCI
Thursday 16 December 1954
Publication of the official valid standard
Tuesday 01 August 2023
Last update
Tuesday 19 September 2023
En français, cette race se dit
Braque Saint-Germain
Diese Norm ist in deutscher Sprache sichtbar
St Germain Vorstehhund
En español, esta raza se dice
Braco Saint-Germain
In het Nederlands, wordt dit ras gezegd
Braque Saint-Germain

Usage

Pointing breed used principally on feather but can also hunt fur bearing game.

Brief historical summary

It is a descendant of dogs obtained by crossing an English pointer with a Continental pointer. The breed was created around 1830 in the royal kennels at Compiègne, then in Saint Germain en Laye. This dog was in great vogue until the beginning of the 20th century and was the most shown pointing breed in the first dog shows, notably at the first French dog show of 1863. The French breed club was created in March, 1913.

General appearance

A breed of medium general proportions with planes of the head and of the muzzle parallel, or very slightly divergent, and with a moderately marked stop. The bone is relatively heavy, the muscular system adapted to work requiring endurance. The coat is fawn and white in colour, without any black being present. In action, its quest is of average range and its gallop regular and supple.

Behaviour / temperament

Hunter above all, it is very sociable, equable and affectionate and won’t suffer brusque treatment during its training. Everything considered, it is easy to train. It hunts with passion pheasant, partridge and woodcock on any terrain, retrieving with a soft mouth. Very close to man, it appreciates living with the family.

Head

Cranial region

Skull
Slightly rounded, ogival at the rear, with a prominent occipital protuberance. The zygomatic arch is hardly emphasized. 
Stop
Not too pronounced.

Facial region

Nose
Broad, with well-open nostrils, dark pink in colour.
Muzzle
Muzzle of the same length as the skull.
Lips
They completely cover the lower jaw; they are relatively fine and devoid of black spots.
Nasal bridge
Bridge of the nose straight or very slightly convex.
Jaws and teeth
The jaws are sturdy, of equal length; the teeth are large, well aligned. Scissors bite.
Palate: Devoid of black.
Eyes
Well open, relatively large, golden-yellow in colour, well set in the orbits; the look is candid and mild.
Ears
Set on level with the eye, not too long. The pinna presents a longitudinal crease. They are rounded at their extremities and are slightly detached from the head.

Neck

Muscled, relatively long, somewhat arched, a very slight dewlap is tolerated.

Body

Back
Horizontal.
Loin
Relatively short, broad and sturdy.
Croup
Slightly slanting.
Chest
Long, deep and broad. The point of the sternum is slightly protruding.
Ribs
The ribs are long and well sprung.
Side
The chest being long, the flank is short.
Underline and belly
Slightly tucked-up and joining the chest progressively, without rupture.

Tail

Set relatively low, it doesn’t reach further than the point of the hock, is thick at the beginning and terminates in a point; in action, it is carried horizontally.

Limbs

Forequarters

Generality
Good bone, at rest the muscles are discernable under the skin.
Shoulders
Long, oblique, muscled, as suits a galloper.
Upper arm
Slightly sloping.
Forearm
Strong, muscular, vertical.
Pastern
Short, very slightly sloping seen in profile.
Forefeet
Long, toes tight, toenails very light in colour, even white, pads firm.

Hindquarters

Generality
Limbs well poised when seen from behind.
Upper thigh
Long and muscled.
Lower thigh
Well muscled.
Metatarsus
Short, vertical, dry.
Hock
Broad and in the axis of the body.
Hind feet
Identical to the forefoot.

Gait and movement

The normal gait is the gallop; it should be supple, balanced and capable of being maintained; its reach is average. At any gait, the head is carried slightly above the topline, never lower. The Saint Germain pointer covers ground well, whatever the gait.

Skin

Rather fine.

Coat

Hair
Short, not too fine.
Colour
Dull white with orange (fawn) markings; some mottling is tolerated, but not sought after. The ear is fawn (a very sparse amount of white is tolerated but not sought after).

Size and weight

Height at withers
Males 56 cm minimum (22”), 62 cm maximum (24.4”), with a tolerance of + 2 cm (0.8”) for exceptional subjects.
Females 54 cm minimum (21.3”), 59 cm maximum (28.7”), with a tolerance of + 2 cm (0.8”) for exceptional subjects.

Faults

• Any departure from the foregoing points should be considered a fault and the seriousness with which the fault should be regarded should be in exact proportion to its degree and its effect upon the health and welfare of the dog and its ability to perform its traditional work.
• Faults listed should be in degree of seriousness.

General faults

 Skull too broad.
 Eyes small, wild looking, lemon-coloured.
 Ears reminding one of the corkscrew ears of scent hounds.
 Croup too slanted.
 Feet splayed, presence of dewclaws.

Disqualifying faults

 Aggressive or overly shy.
 Insufficient breed characteristics, which means the animal on the whole doesn’t resemble other samples of the breed.
 Absence of more than one tooth, aside from the first premolars; faulty position of the teeth.
 Overshot or undershot mouth.
 Eyes brown or black in colour.
 Presence of black, notably on the nose, on the lips, on the palate, in the nails.
 Height outside the limits defined by the standard.

NB :

• Any dog clearly showing physical or behavioural abnormalities shall be disqualified.
• The above mentioned faults when occurring to a highly marked degree or frequently are disqualifying.
• Male animals should have two apparently normal testicles fully descended into the scrotum.
• Only functionally and clinically healthy dogs, with breed typical conformation should be used for breeding.

Bibliography

http://www.fci.be/

 

Additional information from visitors

Believed to had been around during the rule of King Louis XV, the Braque St.Germain is a valued French gundog. Not many of the original Saint-Germain Pointers have survived the French Revolution, but the breed was revived through crossings with the English Pointer, as well as a variety of suitable Gascony hounds in the 1800's. Usually employed to point and retrieve game on dry land, the modern Saint-ermain Pointer is also a popular gundog and a common family companion. This is generally a calm and reliable breed, but it needs early socialization and gentle handling, due to its somewhat skittish personality. The Saint-Germain Pointer's legs are long and stable, its neck is strong and the body is lean and muscled. The coat is short, smooth and flat, always white with patches of fawn or orange shades. Average height is around 23 inches.

Detailed history

Unlike those of many dog breeds, we know precisely the origins of the Braque Saint Germain: they go back to the first half of the nineteenth century. Charles X, King of France from 1824 to 1830, was particularly fond of hunting and possessed Braques that descended from lineages famous since Louis XV, some of whose subjects have come down to us thanks to the paintings of the painter Jean-Baptiste Oudry (1686 - 1755), especially the one representing the famous "Blanche", one of the lists of royal kennels.

At the request of Charles X, the Count of Girardin, King's great huntsman, brought back two Pointers from England, presumably with the intention of improving the qualities of the Braques. Here is what M. de La Rue said of these two "thoroughbreds", baptized Miss and Stop, with whom he had the opportunity to hunt: "They were yellow spots (white and orange), of great pricked, with ears tied a little high, palate and black nose; the forehead in the dog was extremely delicate; In short, these two types had a great elegance and an incontestable distinction, Miss was then much superior to our Braques and all our dogs of country. "

At the fall of Charles X, in 1830, the two Pointers returned to Mr. de Larminat, an inspector of Water and Forests attached to the forest of Compiegne. Stop died shortly afterwards, leaving no descendants, but Miss was taken to the kennels of Earl of Aigle at Tracy, to be raised by a handsome, white and brown Braque named Zamor. Seven pups (half-bloods) were born of this union, which, according to the Marquis de Cherville, had "a white and orange dress, sometimes accompanied by speckles". Four of these pups were entrusted to employees of the forest of Compiegne, who were soon assigned to the forest of Saint-Germain. Thus these dogs, which had already acquired a certain renown, took the name of dogs of St. Germain.

It is likely, however, that the Braque Saint Germain breed is not exclusively derived from Miss and Zamor puppies, other half-breeds born to White and Brown Pointer, and White and Orange Pointer who have also received this name. What is certain is that the Braque Saint Germain knew success from the Second Empire, and that many subjects were present in the kennels of Napoleon III, great amateur besides English current dogs. It was at this time, too, that we infused some blood of Braque Saint Germain to a type of old French Braque, the Braque de l'Ariège (also called Braque de Toulouse), in order to improve the race. Some authors have even been able to assert that M. de Morteau, when he retired to his castle Molestrol in Ariège, crossed Braques Saint Germain he had taken with him to local Braques, which gave birth to Braques from Ariège to the characteristic white and orange dress.

In an article published in L'Acclimatation in 1878, a man named Feuillet gave a detailed description of the Braque Saint Germain at that time: "He is tall, he has 65 to 72 cm in the shoulder, a little levitated, high on legs and always white and orange without the slightest black stain. According to René Laporte, who was president of the Breed Club, Braque Saint Germain must have had the size we know today. Moreover, if they did not mention the origins of committed dogs, the catalogs of the first exhibitions did not note less the size. We know that between 1880 and 1885, the Braque Saint Germain measured 55 to 60 cm for females and 60 to 65 cm for males.

From the creation of the French Book of Origins in 1885, René Laporte also noted that the breed was essentially bred in consanguinity, by the principal breeder, Mr. Bathiat-Lacoste, who registered his first dogs there: Médor, Diane, Fox, Miss, then his most beautiful stallion, Fox IV. However, it is at this time that, according to some cynophiles, the Braque Saint Germain returned to a much more continental type, both in appearance; a little smaller, a little "round", even pointed out A.-L. Blatt; only in his style of work; especially a shorter quest. A few years later, according to René Laporte, the Pointer blood was again used, which allowed a balance to be struck between continental and British qualities. Thus, Mr. Duval, a Parisian breeder, proceeded to systematic crossings: his dog Mica was coupled with Ploff, a very "pointierized" stallion; their son, Star II of the Star, protrudes both bitches Braques and bitches Pointers. Finally, the famous breeder repeatedly called on a superb Pointer stallion from the kennel of the Acclimatation Garden, named Eldon-Don. As for the champion before the First World War, Jilt des Yvelines, she went down by her father, Byrrh II of Etoile, Mica and Ploff.

Shortly before the Great War, the Club Braque Saint Germain was created and quickly recognized by the Central Canine Society. Although severely affected by the war, the race resisted better than some other breeds of dogs, and even if, at the dawn of the twenties, many traditions were fundamentally rushed, among which the French hunting, while Anglomania was raging in dog-eating circles, at no time did Braque Saint Germain nearly disappear. Without becoming really popular, he was very appreciated by most specialists. Certainly, as Kermadec pointed out, "he was a complete stranger," or truly versatile, at a time when the number of hunters who could afford several types of dogs, they went in plain, in the woods or in the marsh, was in regression.

The race was also criticized for its lack of hardiness, which is exaggerated, even though its thin skin, its untouched tail (in hunting circles, sometimes called the Long-tailed Braque) are a little fragile, it is true, in bushy land. He has still been found to be obese. Let's specify for his defense that the nutritional knowledge was at the time very rudimentary. In fact, to gain notoriety during the interwar period, it may have missed the Braque Saint Germain to be better broadcast outside the Paris Basin. But this period was also one of all the excesses with regard to the use of the Pointer, so much so that an English judge visiting a Paris exhibition in the twenties and passing in front of a subject in a class Braque Saint Germain would have exclaimed Seeing him, "Here's the best Pointer I've seen today. "

If the Braque Saint Germain does not have the extent of the quest of the Pointer, his speed or his stops, that could be described as cataleptic, his nose is not less subtle, his looks very sustained and stylish . Moreover, the Marquis de Cherville, nearly a century and a half ago, pointed out that the first dogs of Saint Germain were "very early, almost all stopped at six months". Later on, he always found eminent qualities: "He gallops, fans from far away, stops firm, often lying or crawling, his pose is most graceful. It pays off majestically and is easy to train. For Paul Mégnin, "he was the aristocrat of the dogs, the Brummel of the hunting dogs. He forms a very beautiful family, very distinguished, quite elegant, it is almost a lady's dog, so pretty, caressing and graceful. While hunting, he is very intelligent and very docile, he has the restricted or long quest according to his trainer ". And Mrs. Clergeau, a few years ago, concluded: "In reality, as it is now, defined and produced by some conscientious breeders, it is a most interesting collaborator. Pleasant dog plain, able to cope wherever the other Braques find to use, supporting the heat, having better nose than many and a nice style of stopping and pace, the Saint Germain has valuable qualities, to attract fans. Father Godard himself did not understand the reasons why the breed was not better represented in France: "It is astonishing that this dog does not know more development, considering its pace and its style ", to which K.-G. The Moing added: "It should be more prevalent in the hunting environment. "

To all these qualities of hunting dog that generations of specialists reported in their writings or comments are added those of pet dogs. Hunting, as in the city, provided he has the opportunity to regularly exercise to satisfy his sports requirements, the Braque Saint Germain, moreover typically French, deserves to be appreciated as well by the amateurs to the search for a certain originality than for all those who need an auxiliary whom they can rely on.

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